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Post Info TOPIC: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


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How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


 

 

Definition of Customer Service:

The assistance and advice provided by a company to those people who buy or use its products or services. Obviously this will vary depending on the type business we are in.

 

The value of good customer service is priceless. Its a gift that keeps on giving but like anything else there is a method to follow to reap these rewards. The first step in the methods is “self-evaluation” using the “golden rule”. “

 

  1. The principle of treating others as one would be wished to be treated oneself.

  2. Have an “I- can-do-it attitude. No word is more resounding than “yes”.

  3. Handle question with eye contact and a smile even if you don't feel like it.

  4. We all have bad days therefore be aware of body language it speaks volumes.

  5. Always wear a name tag while engaging customers. Let them know who you are and what you do.

  6. When a customer ask for help 9 out of 10 times its legitimate. They are asking because they don't know.

  7. I know this is hard to remember but when you see a buying customer that person is contributing to your pay check. Always be conscious of it!

  8. If you can't answer a customers question (don't fake it). Let them know you don't know, and go find the right answer.

  9. Once a day or a week, or a month. Go above and beyond:

    Example; Customer wants to make a special dish and needs several pounds of stew-beef (beef cubes). But she balks at the price. Take her to the chuck-roast section and let her know if she has a sharp knife at home she can cut the beef-cubes herself and save several dollars. That customer will never forget you, and she will tell her family and friends about how you helped her. This will mean more sales for your department and store.

  10. Remember your customers have no idea of what it takes to run your business, but they are there to support it.

  11. *Remember also that this is the job you choose be content with your wages.

* The word "content" has several meanings; a state of peaceful happiness, satisfied, pleased, gratified, fulfilled, happy, cheerful, glad, unworried, untroubled, at ease, at peace, tranquil, and serene. Number 11 reflects "state of mind". In order for any working human being to stay motivated they must possess a sense of hope, purpose and contentment. When you are content it helps to reinforce a positive attitude. Number 11 doesn't have anything to do with a "top earner, or bottom earner". Maintaining a healthy state of mind even when we feel we are worth more than what we receive. 

 

 

 



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Saturday 11th of February 2017 07:53:43 PM

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RE: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Coalcracker, did you write all that, or was it someone else and you're sharing it with us?



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RE: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Burgermeister wrote:

Coalcracker, did you write all that, or was it someone else and you're sharing it with us?


 Burgermeister, there is an old saying in the literary business. If you copy from one source its called plagiarism (this is illegal) but if you copy from many sources its called research!. LOL>LOL>LOL> 

To answer your question yes these are my thoughts and they are gleaned from over 40 years in the meat -sales related business. Of course the golden rule is a biblical rendition. However, if you want to use it feel free to do so. What we need is more thought provoking topics, and what better sources are there than  people like you that are in the trenches every day.

Good customer service is an art in and of its self and every meat cutter has their own approach to it. Each and everyone of us are touched by good or bad customer service. 

 



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RE: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Coalcracker wrote:
Burgermeister wrote:

Coalcracker, did you write all that, or was it someone else and you're sharing it with us?


 Burgermeister, there is an old saying in the literary business. If you copy from one source its called plagiarism (this is illegal) but if you copy from many sources its called research!. LOL>LOL>LOL> 

To answer your question yes these are my thoughts and they are gleaned from over 40 years in the meat -sales related business. Of course the golden rule is a biblical rendition. However, if you want to use it feel free to do so. What we need is more thought provoking topics, and what better sources are there than  people like you that are in the trenches every day.

Good customer service is an art in and of its self and every meat cutter has their own approach to it. Each and everyone of us are touched by good or bad customer service. 

 


 I didn't want to use it, but thanks for the permission. I asked who wrote it because even though I don't know you, it doesn't sound to me like something you'd say. 

I would have written #9 differently. Offer to cut it for her/him. Don't tell then they need their own knife.
 
And I don't agree with #11. Yes we choose the job, but I think it's ok and normal to be dissatisfied with your wages. Especially with two tier systems, and all the clerks I see working just as hard as journeymen. THEY can be dissatisfied. I chose to be a meat cutter. It was probably a mistake. I'm doing ok in life. I have a home and I pay all my bills easily. I am at a below average income for the city I live in. I'm an underachiever.
I think you're  probably near the top of success (in pay terms) for meat business people. It's easy to say be content. But I don't think clerks or SOME non union cutters want to hear that from anyone at the top. If another clerk says it, they might think about it and realize "maybe they're right". Most clerks that are content with their wages are in a dual income family. There's a lot of people in my city working for peanuts in large non union stores. I'm lucky. I'm one of the better paid persons. I would never tell the workers at Mi Pueblo or Lion Market to be content. 

 



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How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Burgermeister wrote:
Coalcracker wrote:
Burgermeister wrote:

Coalcracker, did you write all that, or was it someone else and you're sharing it with us?


 Burgermeister, there is an old saying in the literary business. If you copy from one source its called plagiarism (this is illegal) but if you copy from many sources its called research!. LOL>LOL>LOL> 

To answer your question yes these are my thoughts and they are gleaned from over 40 years in the meat -sales related business. Of course the golden rule is a biblical rendition. However, if you want to use it feel free to do so. What we need is more thought provoking topics, and what better sources are there than  people like you that are in the trenches every day.

Good customer service is an art in and of its self and every meat cutter has their own approach to it. Each and everyone of us are touched by good or bad customer service. 

 


 I didn't want to use it, but thanks for the permission. I asked who wrote it because even though I don't know you, it doesn't sound to me like something you'd say. 

I would have written #9 differently. Offer to cut it for her/him. Don't tell then they need their own knife.
 
And I don't agree with #11. Yes we choose the job, but I think it's ok and normal to be dissatisfied with your wages. Especially with two tier systems, and all the clerks I see working just as hard as journeymen. THEY can be dissatisfied. I chose to be a meat cutter. It was probably a mistake. I'm doing ok in life. I have a home and I pay all my bills easily. I am at a below average income for the city I live in. I'm an underachiever.
I think you're  probably near the top of success (in pay terms) for meat business people. It's easy to say be content. But I don't think clerks or SOME non union cutters want to hear that from anyone at the top. If another clerk says it, they might think about it and realize "maybe they're right". Most clerks that are content with their wages are in a dual income family. There's a lot of people in my city working for peanuts in large non union stores. I'm lucky. I'm one of the better paid persons. I would never tell the workers at Mi Pueblo or Lion Market to be content. 

 


The word "content" has several meanings; a state of peaceful happiness, satisfied, pleased, gratified, fulfilled, happy, cheerful, glad, unworried, untroubled, at ease, at peace, tranquil, and serene. Number 11 reflects "state of mind". In order for any working human being to stay motivated they must possess a sense of hope, purpose and contentment. When you are content it helps to reinforce a positive attitude. Number 11 doesn't have anything to do with a "top earner, or bottom earner". Maintaining a healthy state of mind even when we feel we are worth more than what we receive. 





-- Edited by Coalcracker on Saturday 11th of February 2017 07:40:56 PM



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Saturday 11th of February 2017 07:42:34 PM



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Saturday 11th of February 2017 07:54:16 PM

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RE: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Customer service makes or breaks you and it's the one thing you have complete control over. It also is what will seperate you and keep your customers coming back. I love being in a small store where owners can really see benefits of building relationships with customers(I talk sports with everyone)....and always keep kids smiling, if kids are happy then Mom will be coming back to shop and moms talk. I honestly love the "clerk" part of my job.

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RE: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Coalcracker wrote:
..............Number 11 doesn't have anything to do with a "top earner, or bottom earner"............... 



 



 I think you achieved great success in the meat business didn't you? A supervisor or meat buyer. Something way above a head meat cutter (manager). My point was that it's usually someone at the very top who tells the people at the bottom that we all should be happy with our pay. It's easy to say that when you're at the top. I think it's insulting to be at the receiving end of that. 

Also, I don't know what that (our personal thoughts) has to do with customer service.  



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RE: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Burgermeister wrote:
Coalcracker wrote:
..............Number 11 doesn't have anything to do with a "top earner, or bottom earner"............... 



 



 I think you achieved great success in the meat business didn't you? A supervisor or meat buyer. Something way above a head meat cutter (manager). My point was that it's usually someone at the very top who tells the people at the bottom that we all should be happy with our pay. It's easy to say that when you're at the top. I think it's insulting to be at the receiving end of that. 

Also, I don't know what that (our personal thoughts) has to do with customer service.  


 I see nothing wrong with being unhappy with your pay. You can still give great service no matter what your opinion of your pay is. 



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RE: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Burgermeister wrote:
Burgermeister wrote:
Coalcracker wrote:
..............Number 11 doesn't have anything to do with a "top earner, or bottom earner"............... 



 



 I think you achieved great success in the meat business didn't you? A supervisor or meat buyer. Something way above a head meat cutter (manager). My point was that it's usually someone at the very top who tells the people at the bottom that we all should be happy with our pay. It's easy to say that when you're at the top. I think it's insulting to be at the receiving end of that. 

Also, I don't know what that (our personal thoughts) has to do with customer service.  


 I see nothing wrong with being unhappy with your pay. You can still give great service no matter what your opinion of your pay is. 


 We live in a free country and everyone is entitled to their opinion Burgermeister. Although I don't agree with yours I'm OK that you said it. I did spend  3 years working for a small butcher shop and made much less than my brethren in the supermarkets. I did much moonlighting but I was never home. We had 3 little kids and it was hard on my wife.  At that time getting into A & P was difficult in the Scranton Division but I did get a tip that they were hiring in Bridgeport, Conn. 150 miles away. My wife had an aunt living there so she invited us to live with her until we got on our feet. We left all of family and friends behind us. It was a bitter pill to take at such a young age of 25 but it had to be done. I was so homesick my wife cried almost every night. She was a Sunday school teacher at our church and the kids just loved her. I left all my hunting buddies and my brothers and sisters. I was the first sibling that left the nest. Back then your entire family lived with in a stones throw of each other. Our family was close knit and we were always together at family functions. I spent 15 years with A & P about half of them in Bridgeport, Conn. I had a close friend back in Scranton and he would keep me posted as to what was going on as all we thought about. One evening I get a phone call from a supervisor in Scranton that there was a store that needed a meat dept. manager. I jumped on it and we packed everything up and went back to Scranton. Unbeknownst to me it was a one man department. But I didn't care, as i would have taken anything to get back home. I spent 7 years in that hell hole, and found out a year after I was there that they couldn't get anyone in the Division to take that store. That's why I got the call. Back then it was rail beef, ice pack chickens, whole lambs and veal. Everything would have to be broken down by hand. I spent 7 years there and it took 10 years off of my life. I had one of the worst supervisors, a vindictive, resentful man that tormented me for 7 years. No meat supervisor would cross him. This store was on the outer limits of the division in a small town called Avoca, Pa. 

What I took away with this experience is "be careful  for what you wish for." Was I content with my pay, "no", and I did something about it in a positive way. I never walked around with a chip on my shoulder and in the end it did pay off for me. 



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RE: How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Coalcracker wrote:
 .........Was I content with my pay, "no", and I did something about it in a positive way. I never walked around with a chip on my shoulder........

 See? that's my point. You don't have to be content with your pay. You weren't. Why would you expect everyone else to be? Surely it's an issue or else you wouldn't have brought it up. 



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How To Make A Great First Impression On Your Meat Department Customers


Content with the job....sure. The pay...that depends. Too many meat cutters today are not being paid a wage that keeps up with the cost of living. I would never had been able to support a family with what I made as a meat cutter. My entire meat cutting career, I was never content with my pay, as the most I ever made was $11.80 per hour, but I did love the job (not the supervisors).

I believe we should always strive to reach our full potential, even if we never do.

I understand your point is about keeping a good attitude towards the job and that is reflected in the customer service, but its hard for me to feel "peaceful happiness, satisfied, pleased, gratified, fulfilled, happy, cheerful, glad, unworried, untroubled, at ease, at peace, tranquil, and serene" with $11.80 per hour.


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