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fdarn wrote:
Burgermeister wrote

  


 


I liked to put a cutting board across the triple basin sink and cut the beef liver over the sink.  That way I could quickly rinse everything that it touched before it stains.   

So how did that saw fix work out?  


 Good idea Fred.   We haven't fixed the saw yet. It's been broken for a few years. I think Bob was right. We should let the company fix it. Supposedly, one of our stores is getting remodeled and they will get new saws and we'll get their old saws. 



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When I worked for the"big chain", all beef liver came in frozen. We sliced it on the bandsaw and packaged it in4S boats with beaucoup pads as "fresh" . Calves Liver was real calves liver, not frozen, and sliced and sold as same.
Prior to that when I worked for independents, we brought in only frozen beef liver, let it thaw,sliced and sold as fresh. Slices from the back lobe or tail were merchandised up as "baby" beef liver.  Whenever we received a beef liver that was lighter than most in color, we skinned it, sliced it, and sold it as calves liver. Typical of the tricks done at independents and not at the big chains, at least when I was in the game. Also at the  independent chain I once worked for, I learned how to cut and package turkey cutlets as Italian Style veal cutlets for several hundred percent profit. None of this would have been acceptable at the big chain I spent the second half of my career at. 
Jim
fdarn wrote:
Burgermeister wrote

  


 Liver is awful offal. If I was starving, I'd gratefully eat some, but it's something I try to avoid. Chicken gizzards and hearts diped in flour and fried in bacon grease are delicious, but liver is double ungood. 

In my current job, we get frozen whole skinned beef livers. We thaw it out and hand cut it. I like to put a plastic (or whatever that white material is) cutting board on top of our wooden block and cut it there. I don't want that crap on the block. If we don't have any thawed on hand, we'll cut it on the band saw. We don't care what that may do the things you cut on the saw after the liver. We do rinse the table part of the saw, but we don't totally clean it. We get whole fresh calf liver 2-3 times per week. Skin on. We hand cut it, usually not removing the skin. We do cut out the veins. They are very small. The calves were maybe 1 week old. Yes, I've been ordered to and did cut one portion of beef liver, the better part (supposedly) and labeled it "baby beef liver". I don't think that's honest, but OTOH, if the ribs from an adult pig can be called "baby back ribs", then maybe you can say it's just a name. 


I liked to put a cutting board across the triple basin sink and cut the beef liver over the sink.  That way I could quickly rinse everything that it touched before it stains.   

So how did that saw fix work out?  


 



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For Old Timers Only Remember When!


yep coal chickenwings is a a dream for selling stuff that ppl used to throw away a while ago i hear mcd was going to sell them and that was gonna put price up. here its 1kg in stores for 3 euro so 1.50 a pound whole wings about 6 whole wings and in a close by 5 star hotel ud buy that for as a starter 8.50 for 4 wings so a big mark up for low cost item plus a bit of carrot and blue cheese dip. dip could come out of a bottle. big margins on a 3 ratio costing 1 part ingredients 1 part labour 1 part over heads. fair enough in ireland min wage is higher but someones making a mint it sure aint the one legged chicken hopping about with no wings.



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Jim Henry, you brought back some memories with your turkey cutlets story.  One day when I was working in an A&P market in Bridgeport Conn. I had this customer come in and ask me if he were to buy 2 whole fresh hams would I make cutlets for him. I said sure but we are going to have to price it accordingly. He said no problem and you can keep the skin, bone and trimmings. All he wanted were cutlets. So we made the deal and  he came back in a couple of days for the meat. I had pretty close to 15 pounds of really nice pork cutlets. Back then whole fresh hams were selling for $.99 per pound.

As he was picking up the meat I asked him if he was having some kind of an event. He said no I have a small catering business and I use the pork cutlets as veal cutlets. At that time veal cutlets were pretty expensive at around $4.99 per pound. I said you've got to be kidding, he said no I'm not and I have been doing this for many years and all my customers rave about my veal parmesan!!

You know Jim Henry, I started to make fresh ham cutlets for myself and when ever we had family or friends over for dinner my wife would call it veal parmesan. They would all say I guess being a butcher has its perks. LOL> But try to find a fresh whole  ham today!!



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Monday 5th of September 2016 10:19:53 PM

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Coalcracker wrote:

Jim Henry, you brought back some memories with your turkey cutlets story.  One day when I was working in an A&P market in Bridgeport Conn. I had this customer come in and ask me if he were to buy 2 whole fresh hams would I make cutlets for him. I said sure but we are going to have to price it accordingly. He said no problem and you can keep the skin, bone and trimmings. All he wanted were cutlets. So we made the deal and  he came back in a couple of days for the meat. I had pretty close to 15 pounds of really nice pork cutlets. Back then whole fresh hams were selling for $.99 per pound.

As he was picking up the meat I asked him if he was having some kind of an event. He said no I have a small catering business and I use the pork cutlets as veal cutlets. At that time veal cutlets were pretty expensive at around $4.99 per pound. I said you've got to be kidding, he said no I'm not and I have been doing this for many years and all my customers rave about my veal parmesan!!

You know Jim Henry, I started to make fresh ham cutlets for myself and when ever we had family or friends over for dinner my wife would call it veal parmesan. They would all say I guess being a butcher has its perks. LOL> But try to find a fresh whole  ham today!!



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Monday 5th of September 2016 10:19:53 PM


 Unless a published ad specifically says otherwise, I'm surprised that you had to, or chose to reprice the cutlets from the original fresh ham price. Usually, ad or not, no matter the price, you do what they want and go with the original price. Sure, its a PITA, but that's the way it is with some customers. For sure, that's not something I'd like to do with no notice (not pre ordered) when I'm alone and behind on my work. It's the kind of thing that can put you in a bad mood if you let it. I assume you were the manager and can make that call. But a regular employee can get in trouble for not going with the original price. For sure, it depends on the store. For example, I doubt you could get it done, price change or not at Costco



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For Old Timers Only Remember When!


46 years in this business.

I remember unloading beef quarters by hand on a slick trailer floor. The other cutter that slipped and fell under a fore quarter pinning his elbow under the quarter ending his career.

Soaking tree hooks and single hooks in lye in a bone barrel to clean them - once a month.

Mixing chicken gizzards into ground beef. The "old timers" spoke of using pork spleens.

Making "ham salad" by grinding the butt ends of lunch meats from the deli. Add mayo and pickle relish to taste.

In store incinerators for cardboard. Dumping chicken giblet packs in said incinerator.

Ice pack chicken in wooden crates. Cutting said chicken for parts with a 10" steak knife barehanded. Losing all feeling in hands while doing this.

The hidden 1/5 of vodka in the cooler. The wrapper leaving a little early to make a run to the liquor store. Watching my trainer chug 1/2 a pint of vodka in one swallow after work.

Tipping over the chicken carts used to hold the drippings from the wooden shipping crates. Those that have done this will remember the stench!

Separating bone from fat and weighing the cans on a platform scale when picked up. (We actually got paid for bone and fat back then)

The meat scale that only priced to $1.99 per pound. Rib eyes were $2.29 per pound. Weighed at $1.15 and hand wrote the price on a blank label.

Re-inking the roller on that scale and being unable to get the excess ink off my fingers.

Cooking in store sliced, rind on slab bacon on the wrap stand hot plate.

The Hollymatic patty machine. "Chopped sirloin" patties!?

Running cube steaks without the safety guard without worry about getting caught.

The excellent flavor of corn fed beef.

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For Old Timers Only Remember When!


4 year apprentice programs

Grocery carts full of plates, shanks, briskets on truck day. Left for the rookie(s)

Paper wrapped pork loins. The green halo on said pork loins.

At mid career, dress shirt with a tie, dress slacks and polished shoes

Clean up 'boy'

Burning meat cutters twine to cover the odor of a stinky bone can

Holding back a beef rib to age - until it grew hair.

Feather bones.

Market managers that actually RAN their markets!

Watching my manager put a store manager in his place. "You take care of the beans, I'll take care of the fatback! Now get the H*** out of MY meat dept."

Code dates

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Wow we could have worked in the same place! Wooden crates of ice packed chicken, grinding all types of lunch meat ends into "Ham Salad", and you just joggedmy memory as yes we ground pork spleens into ground beef which really brightened it up!
bikeshooter wrote:

46 years in this business.

I remember unloading beef quarters by hand on a slick trailer floor. The other cutter that slipped and fell under a fore quarter pinning his elbow under the quarter ending his career.

Soaking tree hooks and single hooks in lye in a bone barrel to clean them - once a month.

Mixing chicken gizzards into ground beef. The "old timers" spoke of using pork spleens.

Making "ham salad" by grinding the butt ends of lunch meats from the deli. Add mayo and pickle relish to taste.

In store incinerators for cardboard. Dumping chicken giblet packs in said incinerator.

Ice pack chicken in wooden crates. Cutting said chicken for parts with a 10" steak knife barehanded. Losing all feeling in hands while doing this.

The hidden 1/5 of vodka in the cooler. The wrapper leaving a little early to make a run to the liquor store. Watching my trainer chug 1/2 a pint of vodka in one swallow after work.

Tipping over the chicken carts used to hold the drippings from the wooden shipping crates. Those that have done this will remember the stench!

Separating bone from fat and weighing the cans on a platform scale when picked up. (We actually got paid for bone and fat back then)

The meat scale that only priced to $1.99 per pound. Rib eyes were $2.29 per pound. Weighed at $1.15 and hand wrote the price on a blank label.

Re-inking the roller on that scale and being unable to get the excess ink off my fingers.

Cooking in store sliced, rind on slab bacon on the wrap stand hot plate.

The Hollymatic patty machine. "Chopped sirloin" patties!?

Running cube steaks without the safety guard without worry about getting caught.

The excellent flavor of corn fed beef.


 



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Hi Phil,
Yep, the reality is that veal cutlets by themselves have very little taste. They are always jazzed up with mozarella, marina sauce, and seasoning, making this possible.
Coalcracker wrote:

Jim Henry, you brought back some memories with your turkey cutlets story.  One day when I was working in an A&P market in Bridgeport Conn. I had this customer come in and ask me if he were to buy 2 whole fresh hams would I make cutlets for him. I said sure but we are going to have to price it accordingly. He said no problem and you can keep the skin, bone and trimmings. All he wanted were cutlets. So we made the deal and  he came back in a couple of days for the meat. I had pretty close to 15 pounds of really nice pork cutlets. Back then whole fresh hams were selling for $.99 per pound.

As he was picking up the meat I asked him if he was having some kind of an event. He said no I have a small catering business and I use the pork cutlets as veal cutlets. At that time veal cutlets were pretty expensive at around $4.99 per pound. I said you've got to be kidding, he said no I'm not and I have been doing this for many years and all my customers rave about my veal parmesan!!

You know Jim Henry, I started to make fresh ham cutlets for myself and when ever we had family or friends over for dinner my wife would call it veal parmesan. They would all say I guess being a butcher has its perks. LOL> But try to find a fresh whole  ham today!!



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Monday 5th of September 2016 10:19:53 PM


 



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Bikeshooter, you must have worked for the A & P! Sounds like you worked in one of my stores. LOL> Boy do I remember those days. Thanks so much for sharing.



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Bikeshooter, how about this one. Disgusting as it is. Taking case pulled ground beef that turned dark opening it up and putting it in a aluminum tub. Then put a heavy weight on it after you pressed it down with the guide from the band saw. Putting it in the coldest part of the cooler. The middle of the pressed ground beef after a day or so and it would be bright red. Dump pan on flat cutting table then cutting into squares. You did have to trim the brown stuff of the surface. This would give you about 5 extra hours of selling time.

And nobody ever got sick!



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Friday 16th of September 2016 07:33:55 AM

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RE: For Old Timers Only Remember When!


Coalcracker wrote:

Bikeshooter, how about this one. Disgusting as it is. Taking case pulled ground beef that turned dark opening it up and putting it in a aluminum tub. Then put a heavy weight on it after you pressed it down with the guide from the band saw. Putting it in the coldest part of the cooler. The middle of the pressed ground beef after a day or so and it would be bright red. Dump pan on flat cutting table then cutting into squares. You did have to trim the brown stuff of the surface. This would give you about 5 extra hours of selling time.

And nobody ever got sick!



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Friday 16th of September 2016 07:33:55 AM


 I am glad I didn't practice those methods.  I wouldn't want that on my conscience. 



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Fdarn, just keep digging those graves. LOL>LOL>LOL>
fdarn wrote:
Coalcracker wrote:

Bikeshooter, how about this one. Disgusting as it is. Taking case pulled ground beef that turned dark opening it up and putting it in a aluminum tub. Then put a heavy weight on it after you pressed it down with the guide from the band saw. Putting it in the coldest part of the cooler. The middle of the pressed ground beef after a day or so and it would be bright red. Dump pan on flat cutting table then cutting into squares. You did have to trim the brown stuff of the surface. This would give you about 5 extra hours of selling time.

And nobody ever got sick!



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Friday 16th of September 2016 07:33:55 AM


 I am glad I didn't practice those methods.  I wouldn't want that on my conscience. 


 



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Phil,
I must admit that  I did this, when I worked for a chain of independents. Once I went to the big chain (Pathmark) that would have meant a one-way ticket out the door. 
We called it "the Press". Fill aaluminum lug with yesterday's left over ground beef.  Next, put another lug on top of it and fill that lug with short hooks to get some weight on it then put 3 boxes of boxed beef to add at least 200-250 more pounds on top of it. Let it sit in the cooler for TWO days.  Then scrape off the brown slime that will surely be all over the top of the lug.  Next dump the lug into the blender/grinder, put it on mix then LEAVE the cooler for 15 minutes.  The reason for leaving is that it will smell like an entire herd of cattle farted in unison. After 15 minutes run it out into the boat of your choice, wrap, weight,  and sell. The color will be the brightest red of any ground beef you have ever made.
Coalcracker wrote:

Bikeshooter, how about this one. Disgusting as it is. Taking case pulled ground beef that turned dark opening it up and putting it in a aluminum tub. Then put a heavy weight on it after you pressed it down with the guide from the band saw. Putting it in the coldest part of the cooler. The middle of the pressed ground beef after a day or so and it would be bright red. Dump pan on flat cutting table then cutting into squares. You did have to trim the brown stuff of the surface. This would give you about 5 extra hours of selling time.

And nobody ever got sick!



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Friday 16th of September 2016 07:33:55 AM


 



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jimhenry2000 wrote:
Phil,
I must admit that  I did this, when I worked for a chain of independents. Once I went to the big chain (Pathmark) that would have meant a one-way ticket out the door. 
We called it "the Press". Fill aaluminum lug with yesterday's left over ground beef.  Next, put another lug on top of it and fill that lug with short hooks to get some weight on it then put 3 boxes of boxed beef to add at least 200-250 more pounds on top of it. Let it sit in the cooler for TWO days.  Then scrape off the brown slime that will surely be all over the top of the lug.  Next dump the lug into the blender/grinder, put it on mix then LEAVE the cooler for 15 minutes.  The reason for leaving is that it will smell like an entire herd of cattle farted in unison. After 15 minutes run it out into the boat of your choice, wrap, weight,  and sell. The color will be the brightest red of any ground beef you have ever made.
Coalcracker wrote:

Bikeshooter, how about this one. Disgusting as it is. Taking case pulled ground beef that turned dark opening it up and putting it in a aluminum tub. Then put a heavy weight on it after you pressed it down with the guide from the band saw. Putting it in the coldest part of the cooler. The middle of the pressed ground beef after a day or so and it would be bright red. Dump pan on flat cutting table then cutting into squares. You did have to trim the brown stuff of the surface. This would give you about 5 extra hours of selling time.

And nobody ever got sick!



-- Edited by Coalcracker on Friday 16th of September 2016 07:33:55 AM


 


Although this is a terrible sin IMO, it's not close to the worst thing I've seen or heard of. If the meat is cooked properly, It's probably very safe.

I've seen this done once. Around 1994, I think. I'd never heard of it before that, and haven't heard of it again until now. The manager who did it, called it "the brick" and he was very proud to show us this method. I guess anyone involved in this sort of thing deserves to get sick when they go to a restaurant and eat something they thought would be good. You trust the restaurant, just as people trust us. If you (anyone here) ever gets food poisoning, remember what you used to do. I say that you're guilty if you knowingly allow it to be sold. If you wrap it, cut it, put it in the case, fail to remove it from the case, you're guilty. I have to admit, I've been involved in some things I'm not proud of. The main problem is fear of getting in trouble for not complying. Trouble from throwing anything away. It's a good way to lose a job. You can do the right thing and be unemployed. There's no black and white, It's all shades of gray. I think I read that in a meat book once. You have to draw a line somewhere. There has to be a point where you refuse an order.



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For Old Timers Only Remember When!


So what is the worst practice you all seen or heard of? We could make a contest out of that.

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Not a bad idea Fdarn. I am sure even the younger cutters have stories as well!



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fdarn wrote:

So what is the worst practice you all seen or heard of? We could make a contest out of that.


 

We had a thread about that once. It may still be here Maybe we can "bump" it. I think it was called "what's the worst thing you ever saw, did, or was part of?"



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-Burgermeister your right! I know for my self in my era the G.P. was the meat managers "report card", and boy you didn't want to bring home a bad one. Supervisors that I reported to were focused on meat department policy and G.P. The customers where an after thought. One of the A &P stores I worked at in the small community of Avoca, Pa was more like a neighborhood store. The store was 30 feet wide and a mile long. The store manager was an old timer, I was in my med 20's and he was a hundred, LOL>

He would always smoke his pipe in the 4 x 4 office in the corner of the front of the store. When I walked around my meat cases and looked up the produce isle I could always see just the top of his head. I remember once when I first started at this store a grocery clerk came down to the meat dept. and told me The Manager wanted to see me in the Office.

Wow, I thought, we have an office here, its probably upstairs! So I go up and there was only room for one person. LOL> "Him". He said, last week we had smoked picnics on sale and you ran out. I said that's right Frank. Then he shows me a piece of paper and says, is this your handwriting, I said yes. Well Mr. V. your in "big" trouble. Gosh almighty my knees almost gave out. It took me a year to get a job as a meat cutter  at the A & P. You literally had to know someone. Why Frank I asked? He said what the hell is a "rain check"? Well Frank its something we use to do at my previous job. Well Mr. V. this is the A & P and we have policies and this here isn't one of them.

He went on to say, Mrs.. K came up to the check out with a smoked picnic this morning and there was a "scene". The price this week is .99 cents lb. and she wanted last weeks sales price which was .69 cents per pound. How many of these so-called rain checks did you give out. I said about a dozen. Holy crap, when Mr. S (grocery supervisor, a real "P") comes in this week you could get suspended or possibly fired. My knees started shaking again. LOL> Don't you give a damn about your G.P> LOL>

Well in the end I was vindicated because the A & P did have a rain check policy but they never printed forms. They never wanted to publicize it. So what was done back in the day and especially in neighbor stores,  you simply told the store manager that a few customers may comeback for the special price. lOL> And they were taken care of on a one- on- one basis. But whoa to the "cherry picker" they were told Out-means Out, you missed your chance comeback again when they are on sale. LOL>



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Burgermeister wrote:
fdarn wrote:

So what is the worst practice you all seen or heard of? We could make a contest out of that.


 

We had a thread about that once. It may still be here Maybe we can "bump" it. I think it was called "what's the worst thing you ever saw, did, or was part of?"


 I vaguely remember that. I might even had been the one to start it.  



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fdarn wrote:
Burgermeister wrote:
fdarn wrote:

So what is the worst practice you all seen or heard of? We could make a contest out of that.


 

We had a thread about that once. It may still be here Maybe we can "bump" it. I think it was called "what's the worst thing you ever saw, did, or was part of?"


 I vaguely remember that. I might even had been the one to start it.  


 I found one thread where we discuss this sort of thing. http://meatcuttersclub.activeboard.com/t41668649/shady-stuff/

 

I think it's master meat sawman who mentions pressing old ground beef into a luggar. In this thread, I mention the older one "what's the worst thing you ever did, saw or was part of" It was in the original board 



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I had a lot of stores back in the 70’s and 80’s that would simply pull anything, I mean anything, outdated and mix it straight into the morning grind. I asked a meat manager one time why he did that, he said it was all about the numbers. He went on to explain “ I try to use only beef, but you know. Anyway, brown is OK, but we do take out any bone, and trim anything black or green. That just wouldn’t be right. It”ll sell “

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BANDSAW BOB wrote:

I had a lot of stores back in the 70’s and 80’s that would simply pull anything, I mean anything, outdated and mix it straight into the morning grind. I asked a meat manager one time why he did that, he said it was all about the numbers. He went on to explain “ I try to use only beef, but you know. Anyway, brown is OK, but we do take out any bone, and trim anything black or green. That just wouldn’t be right. It”ll sell “


 I really can't see why we care so much about making the company owner richer while she or he is doing everything they can to cut our pay and benefits. I know some managers are "bonus babies", so I can see why they want better profit. But you still shouldn't sell bad products



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Burgermeister,
You're right of course. In my case as  young apprentice, newly married, and newly encumbered with a new house and mortgage, I just wasn't prepared to lose my job by refusing orders. as  a meat manager both for the independents and later for the big chain I never did any of the gross practices I learned as I was coming up in the trade.
Jim 
Burgermeister wrote:

Although this is a terrible sin IMO, it's not close to the worst thing I've seen or heard of. If the meat is cooked properly, It's probably very safe.

I've seen this done once. Around 1994, I think. I'd never heard of it before that, and haven't heard of it again until now. The manager who did it, called it "the brick" and he was very proud to show us this method. I guess anyone involved in this sort of thing deserves to get sick when they go to a restaurant and eat something they thought would be good. You trust the restaurant, just as people trust us. If you (anyone here) ever gets food poisoning, remember what you used to do. I say that you're guilty if you knowingly allow it to be sold. If you wrap it, cut it, put it in the case, fail to remove it from the case, you're guilty. I have to admit, I've been involved in some things I'm not proud of. The main problem is fear of getting in trouble for not complying. Trouble from throwing anything away. It's a good way to lose a job. You can do the right thing and be unemployed. There's no black and white, It's all shades of gray. I think I read that in a meat book once. You have to draw a line somewhere. There has to be a point where you refuse an order.


 



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jimhenry2000 wrote:
Burgermeister,
You're right of course. In my case as  young apprentice, newly married, and newly encumbered with a new house and mortgage, I just wasn't prepared to lose my job by refusing orders. as  a meat manager both for the independents and later for the big chain I never did any of the gross practices I learned as I was coming up in the trade.
Jim 
Burgermeister wrote:

Although this is a terrible sin IMO, it's not close to the worst thing I've seen or heard of. If the meat is cooked properly, It's probably very safe.

I've seen this done once. Around 1994, I think. I'd never heard of it before that, and haven't heard of it again until now. The manager who did it, called it "the brick" and he was very proud to show us this method. I guess anyone involved in this sort of thing deserves to get sick when they go to a restaurant and eat something they thought would be good. You trust the restaurant, just as people trust us. If you (anyone here) ever gets food poisoning, remember what you used to do. I say that you're guilty if you knowingly allow it to be sold. If you wrap it, cut it, put it in the case, fail to remove it from the case, you're guilty. I have to admit, I've been involved in some things I'm not proud of. The main problem is fear of getting in trouble for not complying. Trouble from throwing anything away. It's a good way to lose a job. You can do the right thing and be unemployed. There's no black and white, It's all shades of gray. I think I read that in a meat book once. You have to draw a line somewhere. There has to be a point where you refuse an order.


 


One more thing about the pressed ground beef. It's actually fresher than that 1 lb prepackaged imported grass fed stuff and the like.

Glad to hear that stuff never happened in a shop that you ran Jim. But one problem with that could be when the company asks you why your gross profit is not as good as the store across town, or why you're below projection, or below average. What do you say? You can't be a rat and say "well store 26 cheats on the tare and store #4 sells outdated chicken, etc."



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